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Choosing a home for now and the future

According to the Urban Development Institute of Australia (UDIA), cities need to be liveable, affordable and connected, with successful residential projects implementing these three ideals.
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This connectivity, which is fostered by providing ample green spaces as well as amenities and infrastructure to turn an area into a community, can play a huge part in choosing a home for now and the future.

Sydney-based buyers’ agent, Amanda Segers, says most of her clients tend to have 10-year plan.

“There’s a different property for every different life stage,” says Segers, who assists buyers in finding, negotiating and purchasing a property.

“You might start with a unit in one area then move to a semi. If kids come along, you might want a bit more of a yard, and once they’ve left home you might want to downsize.”

Segers says clients desiring a home for both now and the future tend to be younger parents who want to be near schools and amenities throughout their children’s school years.

She has noticed, though, that all types of buyers tend to look for an abundance of green spaces, shops and amenities within walking distance.

“No matter what stage of life, people want a sense of community,” says Amanda.

“For example, younger people without kids [and] older people are looking for green spaces often because there are pets involved, plus these days we’re a real cafe society; we want to be able to walk to the shops, restaurants and cafes.”

UDIA has conducted research in this area, using machine-learning technology to analyse “big data”, such as NSW’ Opal Card system for public transport fares. They also surveyed Sydney commuters to determine what they’re looking for in their lives and communities, and found that people desired close proximity to public transport and diversity of amenity such as shops, parks, hospitals and schools.

Ample green space that connects the community is integral in the master-planning of Ecco Ripley in Brisbane. Photo: Graham Jepson

Steve Mann, chief executive officer of UDIA NSW, says that these days, most people do not have a choice when it comes to their future plans.

“For example, a retiring couple looking to downsize from a five-bedroom family home into a terrace that’s close to family is unlikely to find any terraces for sale. This is a phenomena known as the ‘missing middle’, where there is a shortage of medium-density building types that bridge the gap between detached houses and apartment blocks,” Mann says.

Mann says that this gap is being bridged, with many master-planned developments moving towards a greater diversity in housing.

“More of the missing middle, such as townhouses, terraces and duplexes, is being constructed, providing greater proximity to employment, which is highly valued,” he says.

Recently, UDIA developed software called Urban Pinboard where anyone can check a visual representation of what their community will look like in a few years’ time. It works by placing 3D models of development proposals on a map similar to Google Maps and allows users to see proposals and give immediate feedback.

“This will allow home buyers to plan for the future in a way they never have before,” says Mann.

Ecco Ripley, a new development in the Ripley Valley 39 minutes from Brisbane, is one such master-planned project that is looking to the future. Scott Blaney, the Queensland state sales manager for Sekisui House, says the project has been designed with a wide variety of residents in mind.

“Sekisui House has a long-term vision to develop a community that will improve with age as it becomes more established and blends into the environment,” Blaney says. “The Ecco Ripley development caters for all lifestyles and life stages, and its broad appeal will help to create a rich, multifaceted community that will last for years to come.”

Ecco Ripley provides for the “missing middle” with a diverse product mix, including traditional homes as well as townhouses, terraces and duplexes. Photo: Graham Jepson

Sekisui House is also developing the nearby $1.5 billion Ripley Town Centre. The centre is slated to be the regional hub for the entire Ripley Valley community, and is forecast to house a population of 120,000 residents.

Stage one of the Ripley Town Centre is earmarked to open in March 2018, and will include a 3800-square-metre supermarket, medical centre, pharmacy, veterinary clinic, and 20 specialty stores.

Blaney explains that area one of the Ecco Ripley community has been designed to ensure that each house is no more than 400 metres away from parkland or green space. In the soon-to-be-launched area two, homes will sit within 200 metres of more than 10 hectares of extensive parklands, and will also be just a short walk from the Sekisui House Ripley Town Centre.

And, importantly, Ecco Ripley will be providing for the “missing middle”.

“Whilst we continue to build traditional three- to four-bedroom single- and double-storey homes, we’ve also introduced a range of duplexes, terraces and townhouses that have been designed to deliver affordable, low-maintenance new homes for buyers,” says Blaney.

“It’s another way for the community to grow with the area and the area to grow with the community.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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State of Origin opener pulls in huge ratings for Nine

Nine’s State of Origin coverage has once again swept all before it, recording another dominant victory in the ratings battle.
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However, the sport’s dominance has slipped somewhat, with ratings slightly down on last season’s record-breaking Game One.

An average of 2.348 million viewers tuned in across the five metro areas to easily hand the first instalment in the annual battle between New South Wales and Queensland a ratings win. With regional areas included, an average of 3.527 million viewers tuned in to watch New South Wales record a resounding 28 points to 4 victory.

Channel Nine’s coverage also collected second and third place, with the pre-show and post-show recording 1.509 million viewers and 1.201 million viewers respectively.

Those figures were enough to give the telecast the biggest ratings numbers of the year so far, and scored Nine a hefty 45.2 per cent of the evening’s total audience.

Perennial ratings winner House Rules was well down the list in 15th place, with Channel Seven choosing not to air the show in New South Wales and Queensland. In order to avoid a certain ratings defeat, the network aired reruns of Border Security and The Force – Behind the Line and will instead run last night’s episode tonight.

Channel Ten’s Masterchef fared slightly better, finishing in 10th place with 704,000 viewers. However it was defeated by State of Origin in all five metro areas and by House Rules in the three metro areas that Channel Seven chose to broadcast the home renovation show.

While the NRL and Channel Nine will be celebrating the ratings victory, the numbers were down 13 per cent on last year’s series opener.

That match set ratings records, delivering the biggest numbers in the history of State of Origin as an average of 2.708 million viewers tuned in across the five metro areas. Nationwide, viewership spiked at 4.423 million viewers, compared to a peak of 4.046 million on Wednesday night.

RATINGS WEDNESDAY 31ST MAY 2017

1 State Of Origin Rugby League Qld v NSW 1st – Match Nine 2,348,000 2 State Of Origin Rugby League Qld V NSW 1st – Pre Match Nine 1,509,000 3 State Of Origin Rugby League Qld V NSW 1st – Post Match Nine 1,201,000 4 Seven News Seven Network 1,126,000 5 Seven News / Today Tonight Seven Network 1,038,000 6 Nine News Nine 1,009,000 7 Nine News 6:30 Nine 1,003,000 8 A Current Affair Nine 912,000 9 Home and Away Seven Network 725,000 10 Masterchef Australia Network Ten 704,000 15 House Rules Seven Network 585,000 0

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It’s time to fill the gaps and set up a federal ICAC

The NSW anti-corruption watchdog, NSW ICAC, has revealed over 100 cases of systemic corruption and misconduct involving local and state public servants and politicians.
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One of these investigations resulted in former politicians and ministers Eddie Obeid and Ian MacDonald being found guilty of misconduct in public office through their involvement in lucrative coal licencing deals.

Recent charges of tax fraud in the ATO show that such issues do not stop at the NSW border and our federal systems are equally vulnerable.

The reason more cases have been revealed in NSW is that there is an effective anti-corruption watchdog operating in NSW, but not one operating federally.

Despite the Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull,assuring us that the government has zero tolerance for fraud and misconduct, readers will be surprised to find out that in fact half the public sector and the entire parliament are not covered by any anti-corruption watchdog.

Why? Because we don’t have a federal ICAC.

Instead we have a cobbled together and largely uncoordinated assortment of organisations responsible for oversight of different parts of the public sector. The Australia Federal Police, the Ombudsman, the Auditor General, the Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity and the Public Service Commission all have roles, but with many jurisdictions, there are gaps.

The AFP pursue only criminal matters, which means that unless it is clear from the start that laws have been broken, many corruption allegations will not be investigated.The Ombudsman and the Auditor General are restricted to responding to complaints about administrative decisions and financial reporting.The Commission for Law Enforcement can only investigate cases of misconduct within law enforcement bodies like the AFP.The Public Service Commission cannot investigate politicians, and has only limited inquiry functions. In addition, Australian Public Service agencies only account for approximately half of the total Commonwealth public sector activity and agencies.None of the above have the jurisdiction to investigate ministers or the wide investigative powers needed to effectively pursue individual corruption allegations.

Transparency International describes how this system came about in a 2012 submission to the national anti-corruption plan discussion paper, which found: “The Commonwealth’s present arrangements are the result of decades of largely uncoordinated developments in administrative law, criminal law and public sector management, together with political accident.”

This reality seems to contradict Mr Turnbull’s statements in his response to the recent ATO tax fraud case. “You cannot be ever complacent about any aspect of integrity in public life or in government. So we have a relentless pursuit of corruption, malpractice, abuse of office.”

A Prime Minister who wanted a ‘relentless pursuit of corruption’ would fill the gaps and set up a Federal ICAC to investigate and expose corruption across the public sector and federal government. And Mr Turnbull would do well to learn from the success of NSW ICAC model.

Obeid and MacDonald: By following seemingly weak trails, the NSW ICAC has uncovered complex webs of corruption and misconduct.

Hannah Aulby is theAccountability and the Law Conferencedirector at The Australia Institute

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How Deb survived driving off Swansea Bridge

How Deb survived driving off Swansea Bridge SAFE AND DRY: Deb Moroney, who survived plunging off the edge of the Swansea Bridge on Wednesday night, and her 12-year-old son Ethan, who made a late decision to ride with his dad instead. Picture: Jonathan Carroll
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SAFE AND DRY: Deb Moroney, who survived plunging off the edge of the Swansea Bridge on Wednesday night, and her 12-year-old son Ethan, who made a late decision to ride with his dad instead. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

WITNESSES: Lockie Rose and Caleb Gilbert called triple-zero after a driver crashed off the Swansea Bridge into the channel below.

Swansea Bridge on Wednesday night, after the car went over the edge. Picture: Brodie Owen

Swansea Bridge on Wednesday night, after the car went over the edge. Picture: Brodie Owen

Swansea Bridge on Wednesday night, after the car went over the edge. Picture: Brodie Owen

Police divers retrieve the car’s number plate on Thursday. Picture: Brodie Owen

Police divers prepare to enter the water to locate the car. Picture: Brodie Owen

Police divers prepare to enter the water to locate the car. Picture: Brodie Owen

A separate accident in 2014 left a car teetering over Swansea channel. Pic: Fire and Rescue NSW

A separate accident in 2014 left a car teetering over Swansea channel. Pic: Fire and Rescue NSW

A separate accident in 2014 left a car teetering over Swansea channel. Pic: Fire and Rescue NSW

A separate accident in 2014 left a car teetering over Swansea channel. Pic: Fire and Rescue NSW

A separate accident in 2014 left a car teetering over Swansea channel. Pic: Matt Smith Photography

A separate accident in 2014 left a car teetering over Swansea channel. Pic: Matt Smith Photography

A separate accident in 2014 left a car teetering over Swansea channel. Pic: Matt Smith Photography

A separate accident in 2014 left a car teetering over Swansea channel. Pic: Matt Smith Photography

A separate accident in 2014 left a car teetering over Swansea channel. Pic: Matt Smith Photography

A separate accident in 2014 left a car teetering over Swansea channel. Pic: Matt Smith Photography

A separate accident in 2014 left a car teetering over Swansea channel. Pic: Matt Smith Photography

A separate accident in 2014 left a car teetering over Swansea channel. Pic: Matt Smith Photography

A separate accident in 2014 left a car teetering over Swansea channel. Pic: Matt Smith Photography

TweetFacebookRain had whipped through Swansea around 5pmas Ms Moroney and Mr Armstrongbegan their run home to Salt Ash after driving down to SwanseaforEthan’s team soccer practice.

At about 5.20pm, with therain setin, Ms Moroney pulled her son from practice earlyto start thehour-long drive home.

Butknowing shewascollecting her teenagedaughter Cassandra from her boyfriend’s house on the way, Ms Moroney told Ethan, “how about you go with your dad, mate”.

She thinks those words spared their lives.

“It would’ve been two fatals. Ethan can’t swim, and if he had been involved…”

As she screamed in the channel, alone, Ms Moroney was spotted by teenagers Caleb Gilbert and Lockie Rose.

The mates were about to go fishing in the channel atabout 5.30pm when they saw what seemedlike a boatbetweenthe pylons of the bridge.

Police divers retrieve the car’s number plate on Thursday. Picture: Brodie Owen

“I was getting our rods out of theuteand my matewas looking out at the channel. He said, ‘is that a car?’,”Mr Gilbert, 17, said.

“We could hear a lady yelling for help. The car started to sink pretty quick. She got out through the window, but she was getting dragged out [by the current].”

Mr Gilbert and Mr Rose, 18, ran onto the bridge and rang triple-zero.

They yelled outto Ms Moroneyto swim towards rocks near the Swansea RSL Club.

Once she stopped yelling her husband’sphone number –worry about himlater, urged the voices from the bridge – Ms Moroney reached the south bank of the channel and grabbed ontoa rock. Then another.

A resident with a housenear the waterfetchedMs Moroneya blanket, before police and paramedics arrived totake her to hospital.

She surprised everyone by being in good spirits, crackingjokes about going back for her phone and wallet. Her husbandand Ethan were almost at Belmont before they got thecall to turn around.

“Eth is shell shocked; hekept saying how grateful he is that mum is OK,” Mr Armstrong said.

“He’s now going over all his belongings –some brand new –that are still in the car. He was also pretty impressed with his ambulance ride.”

Deb and Rod Moroney with son Ethan Armstrong and baby Noah Armstrong at their home in Salt Ash on Thursday. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Police said the car had broken through guard rails on the bridge’s outernorthbound lane and pitched into the channel.

They advisedboat owners to steer clear of the area.

One northbound lane was closedfrom Wednesday nightas Roads and Maritime Services assessed the damage.

Police divers at Swansea found the sunken Falcon on Thursday afternoon, and a recovery team will attempt to retrieve it on Friday.

Police investigations into the crash continue.

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Injury to key Wallaby gives Cheika a headache ahead of Tests

Nick Phipps will miss the Waratahs’ match on the weekend against the Chiefs but NSW coach Daryl Gibson believes “he’ll be fine” for the Wallabies’ first Test against Fiji in Melbourne.
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The Waratahs were initially optimistic about Phipps’ chances of starting at halfback for their must-win match, but Gibson has now brought in Jake Gordon.

Phipps, who left the field in the 51st minute with an ankle injury in the Waratahs’ 16-point loss to the Highlanders, flew back to Sydney on Thursday for more scans.

There is a small chance Phipps has syndesmosis, an injury that would keep him out for longer period, however Gibson said the information he received indicated the Australian halfback would be back sooner rather than later.

“Our doctor said he just ran out of time,” Gibson said. “I think he’ll be fine for next week. It’s a more a 10-day injury and he just ran out of time. We’ll get those scans to just rule that [syndesmosis] out.”

Phipps will join the Wallabies in Melbourne on Sunday and his problematic ankle shortens the odds on Brumbies young gun Joe Powell making his Test debut off the bench, providing Will Genia is given the all clear to start against Fiji.

Should Phipps be ruled out for a longer period, he could be replaced in the Wallabies squad by Gordon, a player who has been ahead of Phipps in the pecking order for the Waratahs at different stages this year.

When asked if he was surprised Gordon, the Waratahs’ second-leading try-scorer, did not get picked in the Australian squad, Gibson replied: “I’m sure he was in consideration and so it’s a real positive that I’m sure he’s been talked about in that light.

“I’m sure selection and higher honours aren’t too far away for him.”

Gibson was adamant Phipps’ late withdrawal wouldn’t have an effect on the side given Gordon has actually started more often for NSW this year.

The other major change to the Waratahs’ team is the inclusion of Jack Dempsey, who makes his return to Super Rugby after two months out with a broken foot.

Dempsey returned to football last week in the Shute Shield, getting through 35 minutes of work for Gordon before flying across to join the Waratahs in Queenstown, where they have been training this week.

The 23-year-old has played next to no football this season, making him a bolter in Michael Cheika’s Wallabies squad.

Saturday will his only chance to impress in a match situation before going into Wallabies camp and pushing for a bench spot for perhaps either the Scotland or Italy Tests.

“For Jack, in only his second game back, it’s really a case of him finding his match fitness again,” Gibson said. “You do that by playing. I expect him to get 20-25 minutes off the bench.

“He’s a player of enormous potential and promise and so having only just come back from injury I’m sure they’ll work with him in the June period and see where he can get to. That’s a position if you look around Australia, a [number] six, it’s a real opportunity for both Ned [Hanigan] and Jack to stake a claim there.”

Waratahs (1-15): Tom Robertson, Tolu Latu, Sekope Kepu, Dean Mumm, Will Skelton, Ned Hanigan, Michael Hooper, Michael Wells, Jake Gordon, Bernard Foley, Cam Clark, David Horwitz, Rob Horne, Taqele Naiyaravoro, Israel Folau

Reserves: Damien Fitzpatrick, Paddy Ryan, Angus Ta’avao, David McDuling, Jed Holloway, Jack Dempsey, Matt Lucas, Bryce Hegarty

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